4.16.2014
















Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from The Gabelli School of Business course Marketing and the City: Tokyo for a screening of David Gelb's 2011 film, Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 6:30 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is the story of 85-year-old Jiro Ono, considered by many to be the world’s greatest sushi chef. He is the proprietor of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a 10-seat, sushi-only restaurant inauspiciously located in a Tokyo subway station. Despite its humble appearances, it is the first restaurant of its kind to be awarded a prestigious three-star Michelin Guide rating, and sushi lovers from around the globe make repeated pilgrimage, calling months in advance and shelling out top dollar for a coveted seat at Jiro’s sushi bar.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a thoughtful and elegant meditation on work, family, and the art of perfection, chronicling Jiro’s life as both an unparalleled success in the culinary world and as a loving yet complicated father. –Magnolia Pictures

Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

Film Screening: Gerry













Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers for a screening of Gus Van Sant's 2002 film, Gerry.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 11:30 AM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

No description included for fear of plot spoiling; however, I can say clearly that there is walking and landscape. Who needs more?

Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

4.01.2014

Film Screening: It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World











Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers in collaboration with Professor Pics for a screening of Stanley Kramer's 1963 film It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Thursday, April 3, 2014, 6:00 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

The dying words of a thief spark a madcap cross-country rush to find some treasure. With this all-star Cinerama epic, producer/director Stanley Kramer vowed to make the comedy that would end all comedies. The story begins during a massive traffic jam, caused by reckless driver Smiler Grogan (Jimmy Durante), who, before (literally) kicking the bucket, cryptically tells the assembled drivers that he's buried a fortune in stolen loot, under the Big W. The various motorists setting out on a mad scramble include a dentist (Sid Caesar) and his wife (Edie Adams); a henpecked husband (Milton Berle) accompanied by his mother-in-law (Ethel Merman) and his beatnik brother-in-law (Dick Shawn); a pair of comedy writers (Buddy Hackett and Mickey Rooney); and a variety of assorted nuts including a slow-wit (Jonathan Winters), a wheeler-dealer (Phil Silvers), and a pair of covetous cabdrivers (Peter Falk and Eddie Rochester Anderson). Monitoring every move that the fortune hunters make is a scrupulously honest police detective (Spencer Tracy). Virtually every lead, supporting, and bit part in the picture is filled by a well-known comic actor: the laughspinning lineup also includes Carl Reiner, Terry-Thomas, Arnold Stang, Buster Keaton, Jack Benny, Jerry Lewis, and The Three Stooges, who get one of the picture's biggest laughs by standing stock still and uttering not a word. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

Unparalleled, zany comedy. Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

2.10.2014

Bill Cunningham New York
















Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers for a screening of Bill Cunningham New York by Richard Press.

“We all get dressed for Bill,” says Vogue editrix Anna Wintour.

The “Bill” in question is 80+ New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham. For decades, this Schwinn-riding cultural anthropologist has been obsessively and inventively chronicling fashion trends and high society charity soirées for the Times Style section in his columns “On the Street” and “Evening Hours.” Documenting uptown fixtures (Wintour, Tom Wolfe, Brooke Astor, David Rockefeller—who all appear in the film out of their love for Bill), downtown eccentrics and everyone in between, Cunningham’s enormous body of work is more reliable than any catwalk as an expression of time, place and individual flair. In turn, Bill Cunningham New York is a delicate, funny and often poignant portrait of a dedicated artist whose only wealth is his own humanity and unassuming grace.

February 11, 2014, 12 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street, Visual Arts Wing, Room SL24H
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

2.07.2014

Selections from the Fordham University Charles Francis | Graphic Design Archives
















Selections
from the Fordham University
Charles Francis | Graphic Design Archives


The Lipani Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023
http://lipanigallery.com/

Curators: Curated by Abby Goldstein with Lucy Sutton and Sally Thurer
On view: February 3 through March 28, 2014
Reception: Opening reception: Thursday February 27, 5:30 to 7pm

This exhibition highlights just a small portion of a rich and unique collection that has been acquired by Fordham University Lincoln Center for our Graphic Design Archives. The material spans a period of 100 years, showing the history of the advertising, printing, paper, and typesetting industries. Many items in this collection are limited-edition printed samples of design and typography, books on typography, paper and printing techniques, typographic specimens, and books on printing and design. Charles Francis (1846–1936), who was one of the preeminent American publishers of the twentieth century and considered the “dean of the American printing industry,” began to assemble the collection in the 1880s. Mr. Francis wrote several books on printing and founded the Printers’ League of America in 1906. He dedicated his life to promoting the industry and to teaching publishing, and this extraordinary collection is a testimony to his commitment and zeal. The collection continued to grow under the stewardship of the Allied Printing Union, which was housed in the New York High School of Printing for many years.

The work on display in the Lipani Gallery is a mélange of type and printing examples that illustrates the inventiveness and advancement in the advertising, design, and typesetting industry during the first half of the twentieth century. Highlighted in the exhibition are the inventive and groundbreaking magazines Upper and Lower Case (U&lc) and Westvaco Inspirations.

Upper and Lower Case was created and produced by Herb Lubalin, a highly regarded iconoclastic advertising art director, type designer and publication designer for the International Typeface Corporation (ITC). The “newspaper style” publication was targeted toward the design community. There were over 120 issues produced between 1970 and 1999. The publication promoted the latest typefaces from ITC, which was the first type foundry to exploit new photo typesetting techniques and not use traditional metal foundry type.

Lubalin served as art director to U&lc for 11 years, until his death in 1981. The publication focused on showing experimental typographic compositions and was hugely successful within the design community as it shepherded in a period of new and expressive typography.

Westvaco Inspirations was a graphic-arts publication issued by the Westvaco Corporation, originally called the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company. The objective of the magazine was to demonstrate what the printing processes and its papers could produce by utilizing a variety of cutting-edge and traditional printing methods, including letterpress and offset lithography. Originally published in 1925, Westvaco Inspirations was a leading corporate contributor to the graphic-arts profession until its discontinuation in 1962. It remains unsurpassed as an example of promotional graphics, an anthology of advertising and commercial art, and, more importantly, a chronicle of a period of time in American history.

Between 1939 and 1962, Bradbury Thompson designed more than sixty Westvaco Inspirations. Thompson was highly regarded for his design direction, impeccable taste and his ability to blend modernist typographic layouts with classic typefaces and historic illustrations.

*Runaway Train, 1985, was based on an original screenplay by Akira Kurosawa. It is an action thriller staring Jon Voight, Eric Roberts, Rebecca De Mornay and John P. Ryan.

Sponsored by the Visual Arts Department, Fordham University Lincoln Center

For more information please contact:
Abby Goldstein, Associate Professor of Art, Fordham University, abgoldstein@fordham.edu
Visual Arts Department Blog: click here
Visual Arts Department Website: click here

1.19.2014

Gary Metz: Quaking Aspen: A Lyric Complaint


















Gary Metz: Quaking Aspen: A Lyric Complaint

The Ildiko Butler Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023
http://ildikobutlergallery.com/

Curators: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton
Essay: Edward Earle
Dates: January 20, 2014 – March 20, 2014
Reception: Tuesday, January 21, 6 – 8 p.m.
Gallery Talk: Wednesday, January 22, 6PM: Edward Earle, Curator, Collections, International Center of Photography

Fordham University, winter 2014
Rhode Island School of Design, fall 2014
Spéos International Photography School Paris/London, winter 2015
Syracuse University, spring 2015
Southeast Museum of Photography, fall 2015

In the 1970’s, the late photographer and educator Gary Metz generated a significant body of work that was very much in the spirit of the times. Metz’s Quaking Aspen: a Lyric Complaint challenged the first 100 years of landscape photography, which had placed a major emphasis on depicting nature as sublime, heroic, and unspoiled. Unlike previous photographers who glorified nature, Metz and his contemporaries wrenched photography out of the national parks and replaced the scenic with the vernacular of the American landscape.

A number of Metz’s colleagues received wide recognition for their similar investigations culminating in the seminal 1975 exhibition, The New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape at the Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House. Gary Metz never received the same level of acknowledgement. Now, 40 years later, his Quaking Aspen: a Lyric Complaint is as powerful and relevant as ever, resonating with current interest in ecology and the everyday landscape.

Quaking Aspen: a Lyric Complaint is a long overdue exhibition of our former teacher’s photographs. We hope that you enjoy the intelligence, formal rigor, and humor found in each of these images. –Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton, Professors, Fordham University

This exhibition is generously supported by Fordham University Art Collections & funded in part from a Fordham University Faculty Challenge Grant. For more information please contact: apicellahit@fordham.edu

The 21 black & white gelatin silver prints were printed in 2013/2014 by Sergio Purtell and the staff of Black and White on White

11.19.2013

Documentary Photography: Italy 2014











Documentary Photography: ITALY 2014

(4 credits) With Professors Joseph Lawton & Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock. This intensive class will introduce you to the basic and advanced techniques of image production with a major emphasis on generating documentary projects directly relating to the people, architecture, and culture of Italy.

The cosmopolitan city of Rome, rich with artistic history, will serve as the source for our daily photographic explorations, as well as the catalyst for discussions addressing the historical significance of the documentary impulse. Our studies and production will take us from exhibitions in progressive contemporary art galleries, to the ancient architecture of the Coliseum as we utilize the wealth of visual stimuli as a resource, as well as a backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that documentarians utilize in communicating their interests.

VART 3500: Documentary Photography: ITALY program cost: $2,550 (includes: housing, breakfast, bus pass, phone, and admissions costs). Tuition not included. Program Dates: July 13th to August 10th. For more information please contact: Professor Lawton (jlawton@fordham.edu), Professor Apicella-Hitchcock (apicellahit@fordham.edu). Application deadline: March 1, 2014.

Apply here

The 2013 Program Book:
R, Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton

The 2012 Program Book:
R, Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton

The 2011 Program Book:
R, Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton

11.15.2013















Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and the participants in the 2013-2014 Documentary Photography: Japan course for a screening of Hayao Miyazaki's 2001 film Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi). Food and friends are welcome.

November 15, 2013, 6:00 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street, Visual Arts Wing, Room SL24H

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

10.10.2013

Faculty Spotlight 2013




















Faculty Spotlight 2013


The Ildiko Butler Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023
http://ildikobutlergallery.com/

Featuring works by:
William Conlon
Sandra McKee
Ross McLaren

The current display of works in Fordham University's Ildiko Butler Gallery is the 2013 installment of the annual Faculty Spotlight Exhibition. Each year in the fall three members from different disciplines within the Department of Theater and Visual Art are asked to share a sampling of their production with the Fordham community. This year, painting is represented by William Conlon, architecture by Sandra McKee, and film/video by Ross McLaren. Despite the clear differences in their mediums and approaches, their works generate a lively dialogue about interpretations of space and representational methods.

Dates: November 4, 2013 – January 17, 2014
Reception: Wednesday, November 6, 6 – 8 p.m.
WEB:

For more information please contact: apicellahit@fordham.edu

9.26.2013

Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014








































Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014

This intensive class is designed as a platform for intermediate and advanced level students to further develop their photographic production with an emphasis on generating documentary projects focusing on the people, culture, and architecture of Japan.

The megacity of Tokyo will serve as the starting point for our investigations, with image making itineraries that will take us from the cosmopolitan ward of Shinjuku, to the center of youth culture in Shibuya; and from the cutting edge fashion districts of Harajuku, to the temples and shrines of Asakusa. Concurrent with our photographic explorations we will examine contemporary exhibitions in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Ebisu, as well as view the ancient collections housed in Japan’s oldest and largest museum, the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno.

Traveling by Shinkansen bullet train at 300 km/h (186 mph), we will make our way south to Kyoto, the nexus of traditional Japanese culture and history with approximately two thousand temples, shrines, and gardens that we can utilize as both the catalyst and stage for our photography. The extraordinary wealth of visual stimuli we will experience in Japan over ten days will certainly inspire, as well as function as the backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that photographers employ in communicating their interests.

Preview the class books:

2012-2013 Documentary Photography: Japan here.
2011-2012: 六人のニューヨークの写真家が日本にいます (Six New York Photographers in Japan)
2010-2011: One Second of Photographs Made by Six People in Japan here.

All books edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

For further information please contact: Professor Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

9.22.2013

The Ildiko Butler Gallery Opening Exhibition


























Featuring photographs by:
Ildiko Butler
Dylan Chandler
Tiffany Edwards
Joseph Lawton

Curator: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
On view: September 23 – October 31, 2013
Reception: Monday, September 23, 5:30 – 7 p.m.

The Ildiko Butler Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023
http://ildikobutlergallery.com/

Image credits: (left to right, top to bottom) Ildiko Butler, Apt, France, 2013; Joseph Lawton, Calcutta, 1989; Tiffany Edwards, Brandon, 2003; Dylan Chandler, Wan Chai, Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong, 2013

The current display of black and white photographs by Ildiko Butler, Dylan Chandler, Tiffany Edwards, and Joseph Lawton is the inaugural exhibition of the Ildiko Butler Gallery at Fordham University’s Lincoln Center Campus. Ildiko Butler (FCLC 1985), Dylan Chandler (FCLC 2004), and Tiffany Edwards (FCLC 2002) are all Fordham alumni and former students of Professor Joseph Lawton. Their work represents a range of years, different photographic styles, and interests; however, despite the differences in their individual focus, each photographer is engaged in the process of carefully studying the world and representing it in a straightforward, descriptive manner. Fidelity to what is framed is of paramount importance.

Ildiko Butler’s digital photographs were made in Apt, France in 2013. Her careful scrutiny of a single site yields a number of meditative, found sculptures and still lifes. As well, her interests in form and attention to light have a connection to romantic photographs by late 19th and early 20th century landscape photographers.

Dylan Chandler’s photographs were made at nighttime in Hong Kong in 2012. His precise focus is on the architecture of a modern city and the repetitions and juxtapositions that are found in dense urban environments. People are conspicuously absent; yet, constantly alluded to.

Tiffany Edward’s large format photographs were made in Staten Island, close to where she grew up. Her portraits of individual children are candid and understated. Despite her use of a cumbersome, large format camera on a tripod, the portraits have an immediacy and intimacy.

Joseph Lawton’s 35mm photographs from around the world have a narrative quality and embrace the theatrical found in everyday moments.

Regardless of the photographers’ chosen subjects, all the participants in this exhibition are deeply engaged in the process of looking at what is in front of them. Their images embrace a long tradition in the medium of photography that celebrates the revelatory power of direct representation.

Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock, 2013

For more information please contact: apicellahit@fordham.edu

8.01.2013

New Book: Documentary Photography: Italy 2013!















6 Caffe
By Rebecca Brown, Raymond Sung Ho Chang, Michelle Kalil, Christopher Nelson, Dorina Puchinskaya, Barbara Rusnack; Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock and Joseph Lawton

6 Caffe is the final culmination of the 2013 course Documentary Photography: Italy offered by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton through the Department of Theatre and Visual Arts at Fordham University.

The book is 90 pages, 10 x 8 inches (25 x 20 cm), with four-color printing and can be ordered in softcover, or hardback in a range of paper grades. Preview the entire book here.

The course description is as follows:

A sampling of photographs from participants in the Fordham University 2013 Documentary Photography: Italy program. Over the course of one month in Rome this intensive class introduced students to the basic and advanced techniques of image production with a major emphasis on generating documentary projects directly relating to the people, architecture, and culture of Italy.

The cosmopolitan city of Rome, rich with artistic history, served as the source for our photographic explorations, as well as the catalyst for discussions addressing the historical significance of the documentary impulse. Our studies and production brought us from exhibitions in progressive contemporary art galleries, to the ancient architecture of the Colosseum as we utilized the wealth of visual stimuli as a resource, as well as a backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that documentarians utilize in communicating their interests.

For further information please contact: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock apicellahit@fordham.edu

7.22.2013

Caveat Emptor (let the buyer beware)



Caveat Emptor (let the buyer beware)
An exhibition of confiscated art forgeries from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s holdings

Organizers: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock and Daniel Small

The artists purportedly exhibiting are: James E. Buttersworth, Marc Chagall, Willem de Kooning, Tsuguhara Foujita, Juan Gris, Paul Gauguin, Henri Matisse, Maurice Prendergast, Rembrandt van Rijn, Pierre Auguste Renoir, Andy Warhol, and Hale Woodruff

The Center Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center
July 26 – August 9, 2013
Reception: Friday, July 26, 6 – 8 pm
http://fordhamuniversitycentergallery.com

Caveat Emptor brings together a cross section of confiscated art forgeries on loan from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s holdings. The works and time periods represented in the exhibition are disparate and the exhibition’s cohesion is further challenged by the tension between the paintings’ initial renown and their true makers’ anonymity. Although one might recognize a work and be tempted to ascribe the word “art” to the object on the wall, they are in fact knock off products, regardless of skill level, that are intended to deceive collectors, institutions, experts, and history.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has definitively certified each work in the exhibition as a fake. Nevertheless, some contested works have historically occupied a limbo in which the very criteria for determining what is authentic and what is a forgery have been in a constant state of flux. Numerous works have been classified and reclassified, even after the passage of many years. At times it becomes unclear where many disputed works actually fall in the ever-changing continuum. At first inspection, Caveat Emptor presents blue-chip works that could potentially be seen in a group exhibition at any museum, institution, or private collection; yet in truth, one is essentially viewing legal evidence.

Beyond the complexities of forensic evidence that serve to authenticate works, numerous additional issues arise when the competing interests of artists’ estates and legacies intersect with institutional acceptance or denial and countless legal issues. Caveat Emptor will run for two weeks and during the second week the Federal Bureau of Investigation will set up a registration office in the gallery in conjunction with the cyber security conference being held at Fordham University. The forgeries on the walls will serve as the backdrop for their office during the conference.

Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock and Daniel Small, 2013

All works courtesy of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, New York Office.
For more information please contact: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu
Image caption: The Rembrandt Database, Rembrandt, Self Portrait, dated 1629, Alte Pinakothek, München, inv. no. 11427

7.14.2013

The new Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013 book!



Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013

By Sam Anacker, Adam Hemmert, Hyun Woo Kim, Jaclyn Krakowski, Amanda Mainguy, Andrew Scherer. Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013 is the final culmination of the 2012–2013 course "Documentary Photography: Japan" offered by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock through the Department of Theatre and Visual Arts at Fordham University.

The book is 138 pages, 10x8 inches (25x20 cm), with four-color printing and can be ordered in softcover, or hardback in a range of paper grades. Preview the entire book here.

The course description is as follows:

This intensive class is designed as a platform for intermediate and advanced level students to further develop their photographic production with an emphasis on generating documentary projects focusing on the people, culture, and architecture of Japan.

The megacity of Tokyo will serve as the starting point for our investigations, with image making itineraries that will take us from the cosmopolitan ward of Shinjuku, to the center of youth culture in Shibuya; and from the cutting edge fashion districts of Harajuku, to the temples and shrines of Asakusa. Concurrent with our photographic explorations we will examine contemporary exhibitions in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Ebisu, as well as view the ancient collections housed in Japan’s oldest and largest museum, the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno.

Traveling by Shinkansen bullet train at 300 km/h (186 mph), we will make our way south to Kyoto, the nexus of traditional Japanese culture and history with approximately two thousand temples, shrines, and gardens that we can utilize as both the catalyst and stage for our photography. The extraordinary wealth of visual stimuli we will experience in Japan over ten days will certainly inspire, as well as function as the backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that photographers employ in communicating their interests.

For further information please contact: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock apicellahit@fordham.edu