11.10.2015

Screening: "Chungking Express"
















Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from the course Senior Seminar 2015 for a screening of Wong Kar-wai's 1994 film, Chungking Express.

Tuesday, November 10, 2014, 6PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24 L

The whiplash, double-pronged Chungking Express is one of the defining works of nineties cinema and the film that made Hong Kong filmmaker Wong Kar-wai an instant icon. Two heartsick Hong Kong cops (Takeshi Kaneshiro and Tony Leung), both jilted by ex-lovers, cross paths at the Midnight Express take-out restaurant stand, where the ethereal pixie waitress Faye (Faye Wong) works. Anything goes in Wong’s gloriously shot and utterly unexpected charmer, which cemented the sex appeal of its gorgeous stars and forever turned canned pineapple and the Mamas and the Papas’ “California Dreamin’” into tokens of romantic longing. –The Criterion Collection

Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

11.05.2015

Marketing and the City: Tokyo 2016




Take one part working methodology from the famous 1972 book, Learning from Las Vegas: The Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form, combine with the megacity of Tokyo, add ten Fordham University Gabelli students, stir for nine days in Japan and what do you get? You get direct acquisition of knowledge through experience with a small team, realized in an online, as well as hardback research volume focusing on branding, sensory marketing, architecture, design, photography, and urban planning.

Get set—Case Study: Tokyo: 2016!

The Case Study Tokyo 2015 book.

The Case Study Tokyo 2014 book in the Fordham University Library.

Marketing and the City: Tokyo course description.

For more information email Professor Apicella-Hitchcock

Book layout for Case Study Tokyo:

11.04.2015

Documentary Photography: Japan 2015-2016: Screening "Sans Soleil"




Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from the course Documentary Photography: Japan 2015-2016 for a screening of Chris Marker's 1983 film, Sans Soleil.

Wednesday, November 4, 2014, 6PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24H:"espresso room"

A complex journey into time and memory, Chris Marker’s mind-bending free-form travelogue roams from Africa to Japan, guided by associative editing and an unnamed narrator. –The Criterion Collection

Read Chris Marker: Memory’s Apostle By Catherine Lupton
Read the Sans Soleil script

Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

10.23.2015

Documentary Photography: Italy/Japan Books 2010-2015





One Second of Photographs Made by Six People in Japan
Documentary Photography: Japan 2014–2015 
By Doheny Lilly Stone Umeda Wan Ye
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
Link

Documentary Photography: Italy 2014
By Basile Cordi De Carion DeBonis DiPane Hellauer Hua Kelly Lazzaro Puntillo Spina Zhu
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton III
Link

One Second of Photographs Made by Six People in Japan
Documentary Photography: Japan 2013–2014 

By Hua Kirsch Langley Santoro Wilson Zheng
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
Link

Documentary Photography: Italy 2013
By Brown Chang Kalil Nelson Puchinskaya Rusnack
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton III
Link

One Second of Photographs Made by Six People in Japan
Documentary Photography: Japan 2012–2013 

By Anacker Hemmert Kim Krakowski Mainguy Scherer
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
Link

R (Documentary Photography: Italy 2012)
By Abrahams Aparicio Atwood Garcia Iliesiu Krakowski Longo Mottola Murphy Raganella Tozzi Vollrath Wendroff Zheng
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton III
Link

One Second of Photographs Made by Six People in Japan
Documentary Photography: Japan 2011–2012 

By Carrizales Chamberlain Iacono Mavrovitis Salinas Zoltowski
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
Link

R (Documentary Photography: Italy 2011)
By Giunta Iacono Jolly Mavrovitis Moreno Zimmerman
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton III
Link

One Second of Photographs Made by Six People in Japan
Documentary Photography: Japan 2010–2011 

By Colacicco Fiore Greenberg Hartnett Moreno O'Rourke
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
Link

Roma (Documentary Photography: Italy 2010)
By Bozzone Colacicco Cook DeMeo Detjen Krupitsky Peguero-Vidal Smyth Tanksley Vasquez
Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock & Joseph Lawton III
Link

10.22.2015

THE EVIL GENIUS OF A KING


THE EVIL GENIUS OF A KING
A new project by Matthew Bakkom
Curator: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

October 14–December 6, 2015
Reception: Thursday, October 29, 6–8 pm

Fordham University’s Lipani Gallery
113 West 60th Street, New York, NY 10023
 fordhamuniversitygalleries.com
The Lipani Gallery is located in the Visual Arts Complex in the street level of the university

Image caption: Collector, 12.5'' x 12.5'' mounted Inkjet print, 2013

The Department of Theatre and Visual Arts at Fordham University is pleased to present THE EVIL GENIUS OF A KING, a new project by Matthew Bakkom. This exhibition brings together fifty-two enlargements made from a deaccessioned art and art history slide collection from St. Cloud University in Minnesota.

The artist was given this teaching collection—approximately ten thousand 35mm slides—and utilized the material to generate a survey through the history of art; however, a survey that entirely avoided traditional classification according to eras and movements, rather interpreting the collection based on chance juxtapositions and natural affinities. The 12.5” square images are installed in a continuous band that encircles the Lipani Gallery. Connections arise at times from linguistic puns between caption information on the slide mount, from formal relationships between images, and from associations between image content.

One might consider the sequence of imagery not unlike a plan for a discursive lecture in support of a curious theory. In this respect, Bakkom’s working methodology and objectives are illuminating:

“I proceeded to draw them [the slides] one by one from the large boxes into which they had been cast. The very first that came to hand was an image that inspired the title of the show. From this point of departure I combed through the remainder, sifting and winnowing in the hopes of discovering what exactly the evil genius of a king might be. I invite the audience to join me in this speculation, one that is pieced together through a series of new photographic documents that aspire to grasp and share specific moments of our shared aesthetic and technological past.”

THE EVIL GENIUS OF A KING
is a subjective inquiry into the trajectory of art history, as well as homage to a now obsolete teaching technology. The shift from the first image in the exhibition, the boardroom of the Whitney Museum of art, to the second, the Tower of Babel, sets the tone for what is to follow. Across fifty-two slides, art historical notions pertaining to style, influence, and tradition are circumvented, yielding a visual narrative that is alternately critical, poignant, and at times quite humorous.

Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock, 2015
(for more information please email: apicellahit@fordham.edu)

Matthew Bakkom (B.1968) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Since the early 1990's he has been active as an artist and organizer in the U.S. and Europe. His first book, New York City Museum of Complaint was published in 2009 by Steidl-Miles.

6.18.2015

The 2014-2015 Ildiko Butler Travel Grant Recipients















The 2014-2015 Ildiko Butler Travel Grant Recipients

Featuring:
Qinrui Hua, Giovani Santoro, Aubrey Vollrath
Curators: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock and Joseph Lawton

Hayden Hartnett Project Space
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
(Inside the office of Undergraduate Admission room 203)
New York, NY 10023
haydenhartnettprojectspace.com

Dates: May 2015 – May 2016
For more images of the recipient's work, please visit the exhibition website.

The Ildiko Butler Travel Grant is awarded to four photographers in the Department of Theatre and Visual Art each year who demonstrate exceptional promise. The grant amount is $3,500 and enables students to generate a substantial body of work while traveling abroad in their proposed countries. The Department of Theatre and Visual Art is pleased to present the photographs of Qinrui Hua, Giovani Santoro, and Aubrey Vollrath made in Japan, Italy, and Germany respectively. Their work represents a range of locations and interests; however, despite the differences in their individual focus, each photographer is engaged in the process of carefully studying the world and representing it in a straightforward, descriptive manner.

Applications are accepted each year in March. Please direct questions regarding the application guidelines to the Department of Theatre and Visual Arts in room 423.

Image captions left to right:
Giovani Santoro, Italy; Qinrui Hua, Japan; Aubrey Vollrath, Germany

The Hayden Hartnett Project Space presents yearlong exhibitions of work produced by students from the Department of Theatre and Visual Art. It is located on the second floor in the Office of Undergraduate Admission, room 203. The hours for the Hayden Hartnett Project Space are 9 – 5, Monday through Friday.

6.05.2015

veteransphotographers photographersveterans















Featuring works by: Philip D'Afflisio, Douglas Dacy, Dawn Jolly, James McCracken, Cody Adam Pearce, Oswaldo Pereira, Giovani Santoro, David Wiggins

Curator: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

Exhibition dates: May 27–September 30, 2015
Reception: Wednesday, September 16, 6–8 pm
Summer Vet Together: Thursday, July 16, 4–7 pm. For all students, veterans, faculty, friends, staff, and allies

Fordham University’s Lipani Gallery 113 West 60th Street, New York, NY 10023 fordhamuniversitygalleries.com

veteransphotographers photographersveterans brings together forty images made by eight artists who have studied photography at Fordham University. Philip D'Afflisio, Dawn Jolly, Cody Adam Pearce, Oswaldo Pereira, and David Wiggins are Fordham University alumni and Douglas Dacy, James McCracken, and Giovani Santoro are currently matriculated students.

Working in black and white, color, and with both traditional and digital photographic technologies, their work represents a range of years, styles, and interests; however, despite their differences, each photographer is engaged in the process of carefully studying the world and representing it in a descriptive manner. Significantly, each of the exhibition participants is a veteran of the United States Armed Forces.










Philip D'Afflisio’s color images focus on details in the landscape, particularly objects that foreground a sense of history. There is a classical beauty to the photographs, as well as recognition of inherent mystery. His picturesque image of an alert hunting dog leads us into this exhibition and sets the tone of inquiry found throughout the show.












Douglas Dacy’s images pay special attention to form and the simple qualities of light. Illumination imparts significance to both landscapes and still lifes, regardless of the nature of the subject matter. The resultant photographs are poetic meditations on the ordinary.












Dawn Jolly’s photographs were made during the Visual Arts Department course Documentary Photography: Italy. They display Rome and its inhabitants bathed in the beautiful summertime Mediterranean light, yet hint at social issues of gender and race just below the surface.











James McCracken’s quiet images made in Virginia along the West Virginia border provide a glimpse into territory that he is intimately familiar with, as he was raised in nearby Richmond. His spartan landscapes are precise descriptions of the topography, of the season, and have a timeless quality.










Cody Adam Pearce’s black and white images made in Morocco and Iraq are carefully composed studies of the relationship between humans and the landscape. In some cases the figure is directly featured, in other cases the human presence is dwarfed by its surroundings, or even absent entirely.



 








Oswaldo Pereira makes very traditional, black and white documentary images of subject matter that is anything but traditional—an S&M convention in New York City. His understated approach to the topic yields a pragmatic record of an atypical event.











Giovani Santoro spent the summer of 2014 traveling throughout Italy as the recipient of the Visual Arts Department’s Ildiko Butler Travel Grant. His images in this exhibition contrast the architecture and opulent spaces of Rome with their inhabitants.















David Wiggins subtly adjusts the tonalities in his images highlighting latent faces that he detects in the tarmac of roads and streets. The resulting portraits accentuate the surreal hiding within the everyday.

Regardless of the photographers’ chosen subjects, all participants in this exhibition are deeply engaged in the process of looking at what is in front of them. Their images embrace a long tradition in the medium of photography that celebrates the revelatory power of direct representation.

Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock, 2015
(for more information please email: apicellahit@fordham.edu)

5.19.2015

My Ranching Life at the Ildiko Butler Gallery












My Ranching Life
Featuring works by: Jean Laughton

Curator: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

Exhibition dates: May 22–September 30, 2015
Reception: Wednesday, September 23, 6–8 p.m.

The Ildiko Butler Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023
The gallery is open from 9am to 9pm everyday except on university holidays
fordhamuniversitygalleries.com

Image caption: Riding Drag on the Brunsch Ranch, 2012

This day we were ‘neighboring’ on the Brunsch family ranch and working with a crew of about twenty other neighboring ranchers. We do this in the fall and spring to help each other out. Just at sunrise, we gathered over four hundred pairs and trailed them a few miles into the corrals at the headquarters of the ranch for shipping day. This was when I first started cowboying, so I was appropriately riding drag, in the back. – Jean Laughton

My Ranching Life by Jean Laughton brings together eighteen black and white prints made from negatives shot between 2002 and 2011. A native Iowan, photographer Jean Laughton moved from New York City after sixteen years of residence to the Badlands of South Dakota in 2002 to pursue her projects. What was initially intended to be a brief photographic opportunity turned into thirteen years, with Jean working her way up from ranch hand novice to ranch manager at Lyle O’Bryan’s Quarter Circle XL Ranch.

The photographs in My Ranching Life are a small sample selected from hundreds of images made by Laughton over an extended time period; nevertheless, they represent a thoughtful depiction of a ranching community from the perspective of a participant, as opposed to that of an outside observer. Her photographs document the realities of the vocation—all panoramas are shot from horseback while working—and give shape to a depiction of American ranching life shorn of gloss and stereotype. The following statement by Laughton captures the essence of her endeavor succinctly:

I feel lucky to work in an area of ranches where things are done the old way—in the day of herding cattle on 4 wheelers I am happy to say we do it all on horseback. And we also brand with a wood fire and drag the calves in on horseback. There are many here who take pride in their cowboying—keeping the traditions and the spirit of individualism alive.

I would like to offer a very special thanks to Jean Laughton for her decision to leave New York City back in 2002. We would not have her timeless landscapes and lovely testimonial on display in Fordham University’s Ildiko Butler Gallery had she not decided to radically change her life by leaving behind the big city and beginning her new ranching life. For more information about My Ranching Life, Jean’s story, as well as her other related projects, Go West, and Americana, please visit her website.

Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock, 2015

For more information contact: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
For the Visual Arts Department Blog: click here
For the Visual Arts Department Website: click here 

2.06.2015

Artist Talk with Alan and Michael Fleming






















Fordham University, Department of Theatre and Visual Arts is pleased to present an Artist Talk with Alan and Michael Fleming.

Alan and Michael Fleming are identical twin brothers who have been working together since 2005 creating collaborative performance, sculpture, and video work. Recent solo exhibitions include “Studio Audience” at Cindy Rucker gallery (NY) and “GAME ON” presented at threewalls (Chicago) and the Active Space (NY). Recent residencies include the AIM Program (Artist in the Marketplace) at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, the International Artist Residency at the NARS Foundation (New York Art Residency & Studios), and the ACRE Residency (Artists’ Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions). The Flemings have performed at the New Museum in New York, the Bronx Museum of the Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center, the Centre for Contemporary Arts in Glasgow, and the Factory for Art and Design in Copenhagen. In 2008 their video series “At Rest: The Body in Architecture” won the “Performing” section at the Kinolewchyk Festival at the Idea Museum in Lviv, Ukraine. In 2006 they were awarded the “Group 4 Award” from the Foundry Art Centre for their video “Defining the Frame”.

The Fleming brothers received their MFA in Studio (2010) from the Performance Department at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago where they attended graduate school as a collaborative. They both received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (2007) in Painting from The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Michael and Alan were awarded Trustee Merit Scholarships from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and share the award of “Most Outstanding Senior” in the painting department from The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In 2009 Alan received the Professional Advancement Award in Dance from the School at Jacob’s Pillow and Michael received the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Education. Alan and Michael Fleming currently live in Brooklyn, NY.

The Artist Talk series is curated by Amie Cunat, Adjunct Faculty in Painting & Drawing.

1.19.2015

Case Study: Tokyo: 2015






































Take one part working methodology from the famous 1972 book, Learning from Las Vegas: The Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form, combine with the megacity of Tokyo, add ten Fordham University Gabelli students, stir for nine days in Japan and what do you get? You get direct acquisition of knowledge through experience with a small team, realized in an online, as well as hardback research volume focusing on branding, sensory marketing, architecture, design, photography, and urban planning. Case Study: Tokyo: 2015!

Click HERE for book.

1.16.2015

Faculty Spotlight 2015
















Faculty Spotlight 2015

The Ildiko Butler Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023
ildikobutlergallery.com

Featuring works by:
Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
Richard Kalina
Anibal Pella-Woo

The current display of works in Fordham University's Ildiko Butler Gallery is the 2015 installment of the annual Faculty Spotlight Exhibition. Each year in the fall three members from the Department of Theater and Visual Art are asked to share a sampling of their production with the Fordham community. Richard Kalina represents painting this year and photography is represented by both Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock and Anibal Pella-Woo. Despite the differences in their mediums and approaches, their works generate a lively dialogue regarding content and representational methods.

Dates: February 3, 2015 – March 10, 2015
Reception: Tuesday, February 3, 2015, 6 – 8 p.m.
WEB:

For more information please contact: apicellahit@fordham.edu

11.25.2014

Screening: Katsuhiro Otomo's "Akira"















Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from the course Documentary Photography: Japan 2014-2015 for a screening of Katsuhiro Otomo's1988 landmark film, Akira (in BluRay).

Tuesday, December 9, 2014, 6PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

It's an oldie, but certainly a goodie, in fact, the grandfather of contemporary anime. The influence of this movie can not be overstated.

One of the best-known examples of contemporary Japanese animation, this cyberpunk adventure takes place in the post-apocalyptic city of Neo-Tokyo. A teen-age boy is exposed to a mysterious energy source and develops telekinetic powers that place him at the center of a conflict that may destroy the world.Rotten Tomatoes

Read from The Guardian:
Akira: the future-Tokyo story that brought anime west

Dystopian Tokyo 2019 has never looked better. Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

7.16.2014

Living Los Sures: Selections

























LIVING LOS SURES: SELECTIONS

Curator: UnionDocs
Exhibition dates: July 25 – October 25, 2014

The Ildiko Butler Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023

The six works in this show are part of the larger project Living Los Sures, a collaborative documentary about the Southside of Williamsburg, Brooklyn, produced by UnionDocs Center for Documentary Art.

From 2010 through 2014, UnionDocs is producing a collaborative web documentary about the Southside neighborhood in Williamsburg, Brooklyn where the organization has been situated for nearly a decade. Part omnibus film, part media archeology, part deep-map and city symphony, the project uses Los Sures, a brilliant work of cinema verite directed by Diego Echeverría in 1984, as a starting point for the investigations of more than forty artists over the course of four years. Collectively, their projects tell the story of a longstanding Latino community that is defeating displacement and surviving the growth machine. Living Los Sures is a multi-part project that restores a lost film, remixes local histories, reinvestigates Williamsburg’s Southside today, and hopes to reunite a neighborhood around a sustainable future.

In the late seventies and early eighties, the Southside of Williamsburg was one of the poorest neighborhoods in New York City. In fact, it had been called the worst ghetto in America. Los Sures, a documentary from 1984 by Diego Echeverría, skillfully represents the challenges of this time; drugs, gang violence, crime, abandoned real estate, racial tension, single parent homes, and inadequate local resources. Yet, Echeverría’s portrait also celebrates the vitality of this largely Puerto Rican community, showing the strength of their culture, their creativity and their determination to overcome a desperate situation.

UnionDocs has partnered with Echeverría to develop Living Los Sures, revisiting his powerful film to pursue four primary goals. RESTORE: Bring the original film back to life and make it accessible online for the first time, working with the local community to update, annotate, and challenge the narrative through a participatory platform. REMIX: Expand the experience of the original through deeply interactive audio/visual experiments. REUNITE: Activate the community to engage vital civic issues for a more sustainable future. REINVESTIGATE: Create new short documentaries to illustrate the issues the community faces today.

To date, over thirty such reinvestigations have been created by members of the UnionDocs Collaborative Studio. Each year since 2010, UnionDocs has hosted twelve Collaborative artist-fellows who work together to produce short documentary projects about the Southside today. These projects cover a wide range of topics and forms -- from short videos to soundworks, audio walks, installations and interactive media. The works in this show represent the variety of form and subject matter, as well as the common concerns, that characterize the Living Los Sures project.

For more information please contact: Toby Lee or Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock

6.04.2014

From the Archives















From the Archives: Photographs by William Fox from the Fordham University Archives and Special Collections

Curator: Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock
Exhibition dates: June 6 – July 18, 2014

The Ildiko Butler Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023

From the Archives: Photographs by William Fox from the Fordham University Archives and Special Collections brings together seventeen contemporary digital prints made from the original negatives housed in the Archives at the Rose Hill campus’ Walsh Family Library. William Fox was a professional photographer who worked for Fordham University on a freelance basis for upwards of twenty years generating photographs that span a range of topics from commencements, to classrooms, and from campus architecture, to student life. The varied images presented in this exhibition were all created between the years of 1940 and 1941.

Fox’s negatives were all made to the exacting standards of the time with a large format, tripod mounted camera and provided an impressive level of fidelity – a task requiring considerable craft. The fact that the negative emulsion has separated, cracked, and deteriorated is not due to their care, as archival standards in archives only developed in the 1980s, but due to the instability of the materials themselves. That we have them at all is a small miracle and testament to the good care provided by those that have worked at the Fordham University Archives and Special Collections over the years.

The images in From the Archives are a small sample selected from thousands of negatives made by William Fox and represent the beginnings of Fordham University’s self-awareness, from a publicity and photographic point of view. His photographs documented the growth of Fordham University over an extended period and gave shape to aspects that the university valued up to and through the tumultuous times of World War two.

It should be emphasized that not all of William Fox’s negatives evidence deterioration. The curatorial choices here intentionally highlight the flaws of the analog process for their mystery and visual beauty, in contrast to our digital age of precision and perfection. Special thanks to Patrice Kane, Head of Archives and Special Collections at Fordham University for her expertise and continued assistance.

Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock, 2014

For more information please contact: apicellahit@fordham.edu

5.23.2014

Case Study Tokyo 2014 Book

























By Fordham University Gabelli School of Business students Domingo Amaro Chacon, Suzette Dorrielan, Marie Georgantzas, Irene Hartnett, Sam Houston, Samuel Hysell, Jennifer Jenkins, Alice Smyth, Melissa Tan, and Alberto Torrado Aguilar Cauz. Edited and designed by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock. Print Book, 146 Pages, 7 × 7 in. (18 × 18 cm).

Take one part working methodology from the famous 1972 book, Learning from Las Vegas: The Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form, combine with the megacity of Tokyo, add ten Fordham University Gabelli students, stir for nine days in Japan and what do you get? You get direct acquisition of knowledge through experience with a small team, realized in an online, as well as hardback research volume focusing on branding, sensory marketing, architecture, design, photography, and urban planning.

Click HERE for online case study.
Click HERE for book.

Documentary Photography: Japan 2013-2014 Book


By Quinrui Hua, Leah Kirsch, Isabelle Langley, Giovani Santoro, Maggie Wilson, and Xuan Zheng. Edited by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock. Print Book, 80 Pages, landscape, 10 × 8 in. (25 × 20 cm).

Click HERE for book preview.

This book is the final culmination of the course Documentary Photography: Japan offered by Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock through the Department of Theatre and Visual Arts at Fordham University.

The course description is as follows: This intensive class is designed as a platform for intermediate and advanced level students to further develop their photographic production with an emphasis on generating documentary projects focusing on the people, culture, and architecture of Japan. The megacity of Tokyo will serve as the starting point for our investigations, with image making itineraries that will take us from the cosmopolitan ward of Shinjuku, to the center of youth culture in Shibuya; and from the cutting edge fashion districts of Harajuku, to the temples and shrines of Asakusa.

Concurrent with our photographic explorations we will examine contemporary exhibitions in venues such as the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Ebisu, as well as view the ancient collections housed in Japan’s oldest and largest museum, the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno. Traveling by Shinkansen bullet train at 300 km/h (186 mph), we will make our way south to Kyoto, the nexus of traditional Japanese culture and history with approximately two thousand temples, shrines, and gardens that we can utilize as both the catalyst and stage for our photography. The extraordinary wealth of visual stimuli we will experience in Japan over ten days will certainly inspire, as well as function as the backdrop against which to critically discuss the strategies that photographers employ in communicating their interests.

4.16.2014
















Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers and students from The Gabelli School of Business course Marketing and the City: Tokyo for a screening of David Gelb's 2011 film, Jiro Dreams of Sushi.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 6:30 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is the story of 85-year-old Jiro Ono, considered by many to be the world’s greatest sushi chef. He is the proprietor of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a 10-seat, sushi-only restaurant inauspiciously located in a Tokyo subway station. Despite its humble appearances, it is the first restaurant of its kind to be awarded a prestigious three-star Michelin Guide rating, and sushi lovers from around the globe make repeated pilgrimage, calling months in advance and shelling out top dollar for a coveted seat at Jiro’s sushi bar.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a thoughtful and elegant meditation on work, family, and the art of perfection, chronicling Jiro’s life as both an unparalleled success in the culinary world and as a loving yet complicated father. –Magnolia Pictures

Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

Film Screening: Gerry













Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers for a screening of Gus Van Sant's 2002 film, Gerry.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 11:30 AM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

No description included for fear of plot spoiling; however, I can say clearly that there is walking and landscape. Who needs more?

Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

4.01.2014

Film Screening: It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World











Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers in collaboration with Professor Pics for a screening of Stanley Kramer's 1963 film It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.

Thursday, April 3, 2014, 6:00 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street
Visual Arts Complex
SL24L: Screening Room

The dying words of a thief spark a madcap cross-country rush to find some treasure. With this all-star Cinerama epic, producer/director Stanley Kramer vowed to make the comedy that would end all comedies. The story begins during a massive traffic jam, caused by reckless driver Smiler Grogan (Jimmy Durante), who, before (literally) kicking the bucket, cryptically tells the assembled drivers that he's buried a fortune in stolen loot, under the Big W. The various motorists setting out on a mad scramble include a dentist (Sid Caesar) and his wife (Edie Adams); a henpecked husband (Milton Berle) accompanied by his mother-in-law (Ethel Merman) and his beatnik brother-in-law (Dick Shawn); a pair of comedy writers (Buddy Hackett and Mickey Rooney); and a variety of assorted nuts including a slow-wit (Jonathan Winters), a wheeler-dealer (Phil Silvers), and a pair of covetous cabdrivers (Peter Falk and Eddie Rochester Anderson). Monitoring every move that the fortune hunters make is a scrupulously honest police detective (Spencer Tracy). Virtually every lead, supporting, and bit part in the picture is filled by a well-known comic actor: the laughspinning lineup also includes Carl Reiner, Terry-Thomas, Arnold Stang, Buster Keaton, Jack Benny, Jerry Lewis, and The Three Stooges, who get one of the picture's biggest laughs by standing stock still and uttering not a word. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

Unparalleled, zany comedy. Food and friends are both welcome.

For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

2.10.2014

Bill Cunningham New York
















Please join the Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers for a screening of Bill Cunningham New York by Richard Press.

“We all get dressed for Bill,” says Vogue editrix Anna Wintour.

The “Bill” in question is 80+ New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham. For decades, this Schwinn-riding cultural anthropologist has been obsessively and inventively chronicling fashion trends and high society charity soirées for the Times Style section in his columns “On the Street” and “Evening Hours.” Documenting uptown fixtures (Wintour, Tom Wolfe, Brooke Astor, David Rockefeller—who all appear in the film out of their love for Bill), downtown eccentrics and everyone in between, Cunningham’s enormous body of work is more reliable than any catwalk as an expression of time, place and individual flair. In turn, Bill Cunningham New York is a delicate, funny and often poignant portrait of a dedicated artist whose only wealth is his own humanity and unassuming grace.

February 11, 2014, 12 PM
Fordham University Friends of Films for Photographers
113 West 60th Street, Visual Arts Wing, Room SL24H
For more information please contact Stephan Apicella-Hitchcock: apicellahit@fordham.edu

2.07.2014

Selections from the Fordham University Charles Francis | Graphic Design Archives
















Selections
from the Fordham University
Charles Francis | Graphic Design Archives


The Lipani Gallery
Fordham University at Lincoln Center MAP
113 West 60th Street at Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10023
http://lipanigallery.com/

Curators: Curated by Abby Goldstein with Lucy Sutton and Sally Thurer
On view: February 3 through March 28, 2014
Reception: Opening reception: Thursday February 27, 5:30 to 7pm

This exhibition highlights just a small portion of a rich and unique collection that has been acquired by Fordham University Lincoln Center for our Graphic Design Archives. The material spans a period of 100 years, showing the history of the advertising, printing, paper, and typesetting industries. Many items in this collection are limited-edition printed samples of design and typography, books on typography, paper and printing techniques, typographic specimens, and books on printing and design. Charles Francis (1846–1936), who was one of the preeminent American publishers of the twentieth century and considered the “dean of the American printing industry,” began to assemble the collection in the 1880s. Mr. Francis wrote several books on printing and founded the Printers’ League of America in 1906. He dedicated his life to promoting the industry and to teaching publishing, and this extraordinary collection is a testimony to his commitment and zeal. The collection continued to grow under the stewardship of the Allied Printing Union, which was housed in the New York High School of Printing for many years.

The work on display in the Lipani Gallery is a mélange of type and printing examples that illustrates the inventiveness and advancement in the advertising, design, and typesetting industry during the first half of the twentieth century. Highlighted in the exhibition are the inventive and groundbreaking magazines Upper and Lower Case (U&lc) and Westvaco Inspirations.

Upper and Lower Case was created and produced by Herb Lubalin, a highly regarded iconoclastic advertising art director, type designer and publication designer for the International Typeface Corporation (ITC). The “newspaper style” publication was targeted toward the design community. There were over 120 issues produced between 1970 and 1999. The publication promoted the latest typefaces from ITC, which was the first type foundry to exploit new photo typesetting techniques and not use traditional metal foundry type.

Lubalin served as art director to U&lc for 11 years, until his death in 1981. The publication focused on showing experimental typographic compositions and was hugely successful within the design community as it shepherded in a period of new and expressive typography.

Westvaco Inspirations was a graphic-arts publication issued by the Westvaco Corporation, originally called the West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company. The objective of the magazine was to demonstrate what the printing processes and its papers could produce by utilizing a variety of cutting-edge and traditional printing methods, including letterpress and offset lithography. Originally published in 1925, Westvaco Inspirations was a leading corporate contributor to the graphic-arts profession until its discontinuation in 1962. It remains unsurpassed as an example of promotional graphics, an anthology of advertising and commercial art, and, more importantly, a chronicle of a period of time in American history.

Between 1939 and 1962, Bradbury Thompson designed more than sixty Westvaco Inspirations. Thompson was highly regarded for his design direction, impeccable taste and his ability to blend modernist typographic layouts with classic typefaces and historic illustrations.

*Runaway Train, 1985, was based on an original screenplay by Akira Kurosawa. It is an action thriller staring Jon Voight, Eric Roberts, Rebecca De Mornay and John P. Ryan.

Sponsored by the Visual Arts Department, Fordham University Lincoln Center

For more information please contact:
Abby Goldstein, Associate Professor of Art, Fordham University, abgoldstein@fordham.edu
Visual Arts Department Blog: click here
Visual Arts Department Website: click here